We created antimicrobial resistance and now we’re doing the same with viruses.

Vaccination is a crucial instrument in the fight against one of the twenty-first century’s biggest health challenges: antimicrobial resistance. By preventing infections, vaccines also prevent overuse of antibiotics, thereby slowing down the development of drug resistance.

Get a load of the above excerpt from an article by Domna Michailidou and Jonathan Kennedy titled “When populism can kill” in the publication Italy Europe 24. So you’re going to vaccinate like crazy against antimicrobial resistance? Hey, here’s a question for you… “How do you think the problem of antimicrobial resistance came about?”

Hmm, could it possibly be that doctors and scientists have been too giddy about prescribing antibiotics for years and years? And that this giddiness resulted in the overuse of antibiotics, which in turn led to the emergence of ever-more aggressive, antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria?

Now think. Might it be that doctors and scientists have been overly giddy about vaccines and that this similar giddiness has led to the emergence of ever-more aggressive, vaccine-resistant strains of viruses? Is it possible that doctors and scientists can be so blind, so stupid in not recognizing the similarity between what we have done with bacteria and what we are doing with viruses?

You betcha.

 

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