Inspiring to share

I believe that changing the status quo in Honduras should not focus primarily on forcibly redistributing wealth. It does no good to alienate the business class because… yes, it is Honduras’ business community that provides the bulk of the jobs in the country. I think that changing the status quo starts with great and visionary leadership which focuses on inspiring the business community, as well as average citizens, to willingly and enthusiastically invest a greater portion of their human and financial capital in the empowerment of the people of Honduras, primarily the poor and powerless. Great leaders inspire and unite rather than coerce and divide. Mr. Zelaya coerced and divided. The way to inspire and unite is to guide a national dialogue that informs and demonstrates why it is to everyone’s benefit to care for one another more, and particularly for those who can’t care for themselves. Having a country of uneducated, untrained, unemployed, unloved people is a danger for all.

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3 thoughts on “Inspiring to share

  1. If by ‘business community’ you mean local big capital, I must NOT agree with you in what refers to it being the main source of employment. Per Lempira invested, the small scale, mostly informal community of producers generates more employment than big business, which is capital intensive and capital-concentrating and tends, on the main, to use mostly inappropriate means of production in a country with such a labour excess as this one. This sector, however, is what we should call the ‘business community of poverty’ which has little to do with our traditional business elite, beyond producing some of the basic, cheaper goods that traditional business’ employees consume.

    The social ‘meaning’ of the big business community lies perhaps more so in its potential capacity to both invest MORE, expanding its operations to those areas of the country which continue in dejection, thus creating a bit more employment, as well as its potential capacity to go into joint ventures with the so called ‘social sector’ through appropriate technology options and appropriate social agreements. This would be one way of empowering the poor and powerless, but one that the traditional, Arab and Jew, myopic, self-centred elites of this country dislike. They produce (and holiday) in Honduras but live in the US and Europe, so their ‘life focus’ is really not centred in this country to the extent that they may feel compelled to do something more for this country, with perhaps significat exceptions, which are part of the hope one can still have.

    One very important potential agreement refers to modify the mostly irrational ways in which natural resources, formerly land, and now land, forest, and increasingly, water, have been abused by big owners. THESE PATTERNS of misuse of resoruces are at the very basis of poverty generation, mainly in the countryside and poverty’s importation into the cities. More than just inspired politicians, we need an inspired and more nationalistic elite, one which will not privilege its own personal, group and family interests to those of our nation, but could see that there is a potential convergence of interests IN A VERY DIFFERENT SCENARIO which could be completely subsirvient to their own interrests, for, in as much as poverty is decreased, the demand for the stuff they produce could incrfease, and so their profits.

  2. If by ‘business community’ you mean local big capital, I must NOT agree with you in what refers to it being the main source of employment. Per Lempira invested, the small scale, mostly informal community of producers generates more employment than big business, which is capital intensive and capital-concentrating and tends, on the main, to use mostly inappropriate means of production in a country with such a labour excess as this one. This sector, however, is what we should call the ‘business community of poverty’ which has little to do with our traditional business elite, beyond producing some of the basic, cheaper goods that traditional business’ employees consume. These are price takers, whereas big business are price makers.

    The potential social meaning of the big business community lies perhaps more so in its capacity to both invest MORE, expanding its operations and more so to those areas of the country which continue in dejection, thus creating a bit more employment, as well as its potential capacity to go into joint ventures with the so called ‘social sector’ through appropriate technology options and appropriate social agreements. This would be one way of empowering the poor and powerless as you correctly calim necessary, but one that the self-centred elites of this country dislike. They produce in Honduras but their ‘life focus’ is really not centred in this country to the extent that they may feel compelled to do something more for it, with perhaps significant exceptions, those exceptions being part of the hope one can still have for a new ‘social agreement’ to renovate our nation.

    One very important potential agreement refers to modifying the mostly irrational ways in which natural resources, formerly land, and now land, forest, and increasingly, water, have been abused by big owners. Those patterns of misuse of resources are at the very basis of poverty generation, mainly in the countryside, and poverty’s importation into the cities. More than just inspired politicians, we need an inspired and more nationalistic elite, one which will not privilege its own personal, group and family interests to those of our nation, but could see that there is a potential convergence of interests IN A VERY DIFFERENT SCENARIO which could be completely conducive to their own interests, for, in as much as poverty is decreased, the demand for the stuff they produce could increase, and so their profits.

    • Hi Carlos… excellent points. I think I was referring to the overall business community in Honduras. But I’m glad you reminded me that it is indeed the small business community (… in most countries, probably) that provides the bulk of the jobs. And yes, I agree that we do need a more inspired and nationalistic elite class in Honduras that is concerned about more than just its own narrow interests. The inspiration has to come from somewhere though, and I think it is up to the leaders in Honduran society (political, business, labor and civil society) to articulate a vision for the country with which everyone can empathize and become motivated by.

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